Wills, Probate

Trusts, Estate Planning

140 South Beach Street, Suite 310
Daytona Beach, FL 32114
(386) 257-3332

Personal Representative

Heidi Webb is a very professional and caring attorney. She is focused on attention to detail. She also is very articulate. Every situation that has come up in my case she has taken care of as swift as possible. My case has had some difficult turns which she has dealt with to her sensational ability. Heidi Webb has an outstanding personality and puts you at ease immediately. I highly recommend her. It is nice to know that out of so my attorneys their is one that is exceptional.

~ Rita S.

My husband and I never made the time to have a Will prepared, but after his mother passed with all her affairs in perfect order, we knew we needed to do the same for our children. We went to see Heidi, who came highly recommended, to create our Wills. Heidi guided us through the process and educated us on the importance of other legal documents. She gave us the information we needed to help us make decisions that were best for our family, and she did it in a very professional and comfortable atmosphere. We were very appreciative of the time she took to address all of our questions and concerns. Having our Wills, Trust, Power of Attorney, Healthcare Proxy and other documents in place has given us great peace of mind. We can confidently recommend Heidi Webb, with all of her expertise, compassion and professionalism for your estate planning needs.

~ Dawn H

MYTH #3: A will can oversee the distribution of all of my assets.

Estate Planning Myths

A will is a legal document that instructs how your property will be distributed after your death. It allows you to name a Personal Representative charged with overseeing the distribution of your property and shepherding it through the probate process. Probate is the court process that’s required to validate your will and transfer your assets.

However, certain assets may sit outside of your will. These include life insurance policies or qualified retirement accounts (401(k)s, IRAs, etc.) that have a beneficiary designation, as well as assets or accounts with a pay-on-death (POD) or a transfer-on-death (TOD) designation. These assets transfer directly to the named beneficiaries and are not subject to probate.

This is why it’s so important to review your account beneficiary designations annually or whenever changes in your life occur. Even if your will and/or trust names your current spouse as the beneficiary or co-trustee, if assets sit outside of your will or a trust, they are not governed by those documents and outdated beneficiary designations can control.

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