Category Archives: Words To Live By

Eight Estate Planning Documents Everyone Should Have (and keep updated!)

Estate Plan Documents

An Estate Plan contains many documents, some that people are unaware of and need. Here is an overview of eight documents you may need to prepare for yourself and your family with the help of an attorney.

  1. LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT

A legal document used to distribute property to beneficiaries, specify last wishes, name guardians for minors and identify who is responsible for managing the estate and implementing your requests. Every adult needs one. If you don’t specify who will take care of your children and who gets your possessions, the state in which you reside will do it for you and it may not always be what you would’ve wanted.

  1. DURABLE POWER OF ATTORNEY

A Durable Power of Attorney gives someone you trust authority to handle your financial and legal matters if you’re unable to do so yourself. Of course, the person selected needs to be someone whom you trust will represent your best interests. Review my blog post here on how to choose the correct Power of Attorney (link to old blog post)

  1. HEALTH CARE SURROGATE DESIGNATION

You assign a healthcare proxy or surrogate to make medical decisions for you when you are incapable of doing so but there is an expectation of survival. This person will need relevant health information so be sure it includes a HIPAA provision that gives your physician(s) permission to disclose your medical information.

  1. LIVING WILL AND MEDICAL DIRECTIVES

A living will let you specify what types of medical treatment you want to sustain your life if you’re terminally ill or are in a vegetative state. Medical directives apply if you become incapacitated and are unable to communicate your wishes for treatment.  The difference between the Health Care Surrogate and the Living Will and Right of Privacy Declaration is that the Health Care Surrogate is written for times of poor health to allow full access to healthcare providers and information; when you are unable to make your own decisions, yet the thought is that there will be survival with quality of life. The Living Will is essentially the document that says when YOU would like to say “turn it off if there is no hope”. 

  1. REVOCABLE OR LIVING TRUST

In many states, a living trust can be used to distribute property more privately than a will –Florida is one of those states. It also helps avoid a costly and stressful probate court process allowing a more seamless administration of your Estate.  There are many circumstances that dictate a Trust being appropriate and many times that I advise they are unnecessary.  That said, I strongly recommend folks consider a Trust in the following circumstances:  When you have real property in more than one state, children or young adults that stand to inherit a substantial sum, or concerns about your mental capacity declining.

  1. BENEFICIARY FORMS

For insurance policies, retirement accounts, and some other assets, the beneficiary form prevails over the will. Whom you name in these documents will receive the assets, so make sure they are reviewed and updated every few years if needed, and your Attorney includes them in your plan.

  1. LETTERS OF INSTRUCTION

A way to share any wishes not covered by a will, such as preferences on your funeral, how to care for your pets or whether you want to donate your organs.

  1. LIST OF CONTACTS

A detailed list of people to contact in certain circumstances, including family, friends and the professionals who oversee your legal, financial, insurance and health matters.

Also, advise your family where these documents are and keep them in a safe place. If you live in the Daytona Beach, Florida area and have more questions regarding Estate Planning, call me for a free consultation.

 

Estate Planning Pitfalls

There are numerous pitfalls of which you need to be aware regarding your Estate Plan.

You’ve worked way too hard to leave your estate plan to chance. Stop procrastinating and protect your family and loved ones and your hard-earned legacy today. However, when doing so, there are numerous pitfalls of which you should be aware.

A simple Google search can reveal some harrowing examples of those pitfalls. This is part one of a multi-part series of what can happen when Estate Planning goes wrong:

Pitfall Possibility #1: Picking An Inappropriate Personal Representative

Are there any long-standing feuds in your family? Does your anticipated Personal Representative live near you? Who will handle your final affairs in an appropriate and fair manner?

These are all questions to spend some time thinking about when determining the best person or persons to act on your behalf after your death. Read on to review an example of what can happen if these things aren’t considered properly:

“When you’re dealing with families, things can get complicated—quick. We see so many cases come through with unresolved feuds between siblings. It’s one of the most common causes of litigation over an estate.

I handled one case where a client’s sister had been named the executor of their father’s estate, despite the fact that she lived in a different state than both her father and brother, whom she’d been fighting with for years.

Ideally, in a case like that, the parents would have named an objective, independent personal representative—like another family member or a trusted friend—as their estate’s executor, instead of one of the kids.

But that didn’t happen here.

After the father passed away, our client started to take care of a few things around the house, not realizing he didn’t have the legal right to do so. Once his sister arrived, there were accusations about items being removed—and a long legal battle ensued.

Ultimately, even though the estate was to be divided evenly, our client’s sister had all of the decision-making power to decide how that happened, so long as the monetary value was equal. There is no way to challenge her decisions in court, and we’re still waiting to see whether or not the siblings can put their feelings aside and divide the estate fairly.

To avoid contentious situations like this, we counsel clients to consider the complicated dynamics between the family members named in a will. If there’s even a possibility of an estate causing fights or damaging relationships, we encourage them to look for an independent personal representative who can settle things fairly.”

                                                    —Tom Gisriel, attorney at Pessin Katz Law, Baltimore, Md.

Mr. Gisriel finishes his story with some valuable advice: Consider complicated dynamics between family members and think about an independent Personal Representative if those dynamics will damage relationships –a neutral family friend? Your Attorney?

Follow the blog, so you do not miss the next chapters of Estate Planning Pitfalls.

Avoid these headaches by putting your Estate Plan in motion today by meeting with an Estate Planning Attorney where you reside.

Heidi S. Webb provides competent, experienced and trusted Estate Planning and Probate Estate Administration services to clients in the Daytona Beach, Florida area. Call today to schedule your free legal consultation.

Original Article with “case studies” located at https://www.learnvest.com/knowledge-center/estate-planning-mistakes

How to Choose a Good Nursing Home

Knowing what to look for when choosing a good nursing home for your loved one is essential. Here in Florida, some nursing homes in Miami got into some serious trouble after Irma hit because there were not compliant with State regulations. That raised the question, “How do you choose the best nursing home for your loved one?” Facilities have different levels of care they provide, but for purposes of this post, I am going to concentrate on 24-hour care.

First, let’s give a definition of Nursing Home Services: A nursing home provides 24-hour nursing and personal care to residents. Nursing care is provided by licensed practical nurses (LPNs) and registered nurses (RNs). Personal attention is given by certified nursing assistants (CNAs) and can include help with bathing, dressing, eating, walking, and physical transfer (like moving from a bed to a chair). (Source here)

Next, create a list of the homes near you that provide this services. I have put together a basic list to help answer to help with this dilemma. Keep in mind, this is just a start, and sometimes your gut reaction to an institution is the best reference.

1. Check State Licenses. In the State of Florida, you can go to this website to check on the license on any homes on your list. Once you put in the name, you can see what type facility they are licensed to have. Depending on the needs of your loved one, not every institution may be authorized to meet these requirements. This site will also provide information on the staff and their licenses.

2. Visit the Facility. Call and make an appointment to meet with the administrator. Have a list of questions ready and make sure you are satisfied with the answers. Get a tour of the facility to see if it meets your expectations. Also, interview some staff to get a feel for the type of people that will be taking care of your loved one. Here is an excellent list of questions.

3. Unplanned Visits. Once you have chosen a facility show up unannounced to see if this facility provides everything it promised in your questioning. If you feel something is wrong, go to the administrator so that can address your issue.

As with any significant life decision, there are many ways to choose the best nursing home. This list is just a start, but I hope it can help educate you on this difficult decision.

Words To Live By

I try to take one day at a time, but sometimes several days attack me at once.

                                                                           ~J. Yane

Words To Live By

I am thankful for laughter, except when milk comes out of my nose.

                                                                                         ~Woody Allen  

 

Words To Live By

Planning is bringing the future into the present so that you can do something about it now.

                                                                 ~Alan Lakein

 

Words to Live By

Let our advance worrying become advance thinking and planning.

                                                                                       ~Winston Churchill